Everything You Ever Needed To Know About First Aid Training and Certification

We have witnessed many accidents and illnesses while on the streets or in the workplace. In such a scenario, the first ideal step after calling 000 would be giving first aid to the injured. 

What is first aid?

First aid refers to the immediate course of action one takes to provide care and support to the injured before professional medical help arrives.

Depending upon the type of injury and the severity of the injury, we decide what kind of aid one should provide. Giving first aid can make a significant difference for the injured. You can save a life with your careful actions.

Why is it essential to have first aid training and a certificate?

The course of action that you take directly affects the condition of the injured. With no first aid training, you can only perform basic tasks like identification, calling for medical assistance, saving the victim from extra hazards. In case of a severe accident, you may get guidance from emergency system dispatchers to perform CPR or use an ADE.

However, delay in giving medical care or providing first aid with partial knowledge is risky and dangerous. It is necessary to know the use of the tools in a first aid kit, when to use them, and what vital skills and techniques are required to handle a specific injury.

First aid training enables you to confidently and carefully help people in need.

West Coast Water Safety (WCWS) offers you a fully customizable group first aid training course. You choose the time and place we offer you certified training according to your needs – for both freshers and re-qualification. Log on to our website, contact us and get your First Aid Certificate Perth 450 2660000 in a few easy steps.

Here are a few crucial things that you should know about first aid training and certification:

1. There are many first aid courses available. To choose the right course, it is essential to know the environmental requirements and position’s requirements. It is necessary to know what skills one requires to deal with hazards and work on them.After getting a first-aid certificate, one should revisit the learned skills formally and apply for re-qualification. Usually, it is done every three years to maintain the title of a certified first aid giver.

2. First aid courses train people to deal with cuts, wounds, cardiac and respiratory problems, and many more. Before getting into a formal training course, it is important to know your capabilities when looking at blood or injury directly.

3. From conducting training for school children to churches, WCWS will understand your environment needs and compose a course that will give you excellent skills and a First Aid Certificate Perth 450 260000.

WCWS is a team of the most experienced lifeguards and event safety guards in Australia. With the large crew with people from various safety disciplines on board, we ensure complete security to around 1.5 million people every year. We understand the need for safety and work to save lives and make our fellows able to save lives. With our First Aid Certificate Perth 450 260000, we promise to make every trainee a confident and skilled first aider.

Everything You Ever Needed To Know About Senior First Aid Courses and Training

Senior First Aid is the first and immediate medical assistance given to a senior person suffering from either minor or serious illness or injury. The first aid is provided with care to preserve the life of the injured ones. It prevents the condition from worsening and promotes recovery. Senior First Aid Course Geraldton 370 92000 are the specialized courses one may take to receive first aid skills and knowledge. 

Senior first aid training is an opportunity to discover how to do some life-saving things. The most common skill one expects to gain from such a course is how to perform CPR. There are many other skills and learnings one may gain from such courses and training. Here are some most crucial and life-saving skills one can learn from Senior First Aid Course Geraldton 370 92000:

CPR and AED 

CPR (Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation) has become seemingly common and the most crucial technique today that one expects to learn from first aid courses and training. CPR and AED training are two different yet very effective processes of saving the life of someone suffering from cardiac arrest. CPR is kind of like a manual heartbeat, which is an act of repeatedly compressing a person’s chest to keep the blood pumping. 

CPR training helps individuals learn how many compressions should be given between each breadth and how deep each compression should be. Besides, one will also learn about AED, a machine that can restart the heart that ultimately doubles the patient’s chance of survival. Senior First Aid Course Geraldton 370 92000 will provide all the basic knowledge on operating on these life-saving devices.

Wound care

First aid courses and training teach you how to bandage wounds correctly, treat bruises & burns, and care for other face & chest wounds. These are the simple skills that one should learn to stay prepared in case of emergencies.

Poisons

One needs to be properly equipped to deal with deadly poisons. A person may get ingested from carbon monoxide poisoning, toxic plant exposure, stings, bites, and more. And the treatment of such poisoning demands immediate actions. Therefore, one must have the proper knowledge to identify the type and care for it. One must also know when to look for assistance and how to salvage the situation before it arrives. 

Choking and breathing emergencies

Whether someone is six months, 16 years, or 60 years old, they can all experience choking. It is the effect of the food getting stuck in the throats or when someone consumes something to which he/she is allergic and requires immediate action as this can cause breathing problems and may lead to death if not treated immediately. In the first aid course and training, one will learn how to act in these situations. Besides, one can also learn about other breathing emergencies and offer aid to those with asthma and anaphylaxis.

Body injuries

The senior first aid course and training will provide the basic knowledge on how to aid those with body injuries and what medical assistance is required during these cases. And if the injuries are severe or minor if the injured need more medical assistance or hospitalization. 

Sudden medical emergencies

The course also assists on what to do during sudden medical emergencies, for example, diabetic emergencies, seizures, mental health emergencies, heart attacks, etc. Older people are more vulnerable to these sudden medical emergencies. 

Whatever is taught in Senior First Aid Course Geraldton 370 92000 can be applied in any medical situation requiring first aid treatment. West Coast Water Safety takes the time to educate people on what to do in emergencies and how to take care of the injured ones. The course helps individuals gain the skills that could further help others and feel confident when an emergency occurs.

What to Expect from an Aquatic Rescue for Group 3 Pools

The Aquatic Rescue for Group 3 pools program helps learners meet the requirements of the code of practice for construction, design, operation, maintenance and management of aquatic resources in Western Australia. The program aims to equip those skills to Group 3 swimming pool owners , operators and their staff.

This course sets itself apart as the only one that acquaints participants with the skills to respond quickly to emergencies and minimise the chances of someone suffering long term damage. Additionally, learners get skills on how to conduct basic water rescues around Group 3 Pool environments.

The Health Department of West Australia Code of Practice for Aquatic Facilities  asks for the swimming pool rescue award to be re-assessed at the end of every 3 years. Re-assessing this award every three years also recommends participants to refresh their skills annually with an annual qualifitication.

Aquatic Rescue For Group 3 Pools only takes a 3 hours face to face duration.

Entry Requirements

Below are the Entry Requirements for Aquatic Rescue for Group 3 Pools:

  1. Fluency in both written and spoken English. Reasonable level at least AQF Level 3. You might also be required to provide a link to your LLN assessment.
  2. Participant must be physically fit and have good swimming ability to complete the qualification successfully
  3. There are no work placement requirements. We thought it best to clear this frequently asked question.
  4. There are also no minimum age requirements. However participants must feel comfortable to interact in an adult learning environment.
  5. Certification requirements include the Aquatic Rescue for Group 3 Award

Course content includes:

The course includes the following:

  1. Theoretical studies on aquatic environments, rescue techniques and water safety.
  2. CPR on children, adults and babies.
  3. Dry rescuing of a person in difficulty. That is someone who isnt an adequate swimmer and is at least 5 metres away from safety. Here you are taught how to use an aid without necessarily entering the water. The tutors will also demonstrate instances of a throwing rescue or reach rescue.
  4. Demonstration on how to rescue a person in difficulty using a flotation aid.
  5. Recover and Resuscitating a victim on the deepest end of the pool
  6. Recovering objects from the bottom of a pool. Usually this helps the learners to imagine a person-scenerio who lies unconcious at the pool bottom.
  7. Assesment of respiratory failue and illustration of rescue breathing for at least one minute.
  8. Removal of a patient from the water
  9. Perfoming DRSABCD
  10. Placing the person in recovery position

Three Reasons to Become a Pool Party Lifeguards

People enjoy pool parties and swimming.  There is every reason to hold a pool party and there is every reason to also hire a lifeguard during a pool party.  For most party organizers,hiring a lifeguard only comes as an afterthought in case an accident takes place. Water accidents are risky because a drawning person will succumb within seconds.  Most people are ignorant when organizing these parties and often think someone else is watching over the swimmers. When for one fact, each person is busy enjoying life. We advise that pool parties should always be prepared for emergencies. And this is why we wrote this short guide on the importance of becoming a pool party lifeguard.

You Become the Keeper, the Guardian Angel

Party hosts might sometimes have too much to do and watching over children swim can become a great distraction.  As a lifeguard, you will keep an eye on the children as the hosts prepare the party. Incase of an emergency or accident, you will jump into the moment and save the day. This is because you are keen and watching each step the swimmers are taking.

You will have Fun

You will experience alot of fun while standing near a pool and looking at the swimmers. Pool parties are often enjoyable with the music. However, dont get lost in the fun and forget your work. Enforce pool rules and supervise everything that’s taking place in the pool. Ensure the swimmers feel safe and are able to have fun with sufficient comfort.

First Aid Skills

You will learn valuable first aid skills as a lifeguard. You will be trained in CPR, and have the ability and skills to spot any signs of struggle in the water. Quick response is an important skill that every lifeguard should have. This will come in handy even outside the pool and will help you respond to accidents in day to day events.

Cooperation Skills

Lifeguards are trained to work as a team. In life, cooperation is essential. In the case of a pool party emergency involving several people, a lifeguard can organize other people in the pool to cooperate and help save lives. The guiding spirit for lifeguards is teamwork, respect, camaraderie, friendship and loyalty.

Helping Others

As a pool party lifeguard, you will feel satisfied for enabling others to enjoy a safe environment. It feels good to help others. This will raise your confidence, self esteem and the urge to keep on helping people.

According to the Centre for Disease Control and Prevention, ten people drown every day in the USA. This has ranked drowning as the number 5 cause of unintentional injury death.  And while most people think only children are drawn, note adults can drown too. The institutions also cautions drinking around a pool as this can also result in drowning. As a lifeguard, you can help save lives during pool parties and contribute to reducing that figure.

5 Water Safety Tips: Be aware to prevent drowning

The World Health Organization indicates there are 320,000 annual drowning deaths worldwide.This statistic positions drowning as the world’s number three cause of unintentional death. 

The good news is that people can potentially prevent drowning by learning to swim proficiently, being aware of danger and always following water-safe protocols.

Drowning is quiet and quick

A dangerous misconception is that the average person likens drowning to what they see on screen – frantic thrashing arms, loud screaming and waving are common depictions. There is a massive difference between how movie directors depict a drowning person and how it happens in reality. This ignorance has led to slow or no response to emergencies. A drowning person is silent, as they have no spare air for screaming. They may frantically ‘climb the ladder’ for a few seconds, but this can be easily overlooked.  Often, they are exhausted and simply give up and slip under. You must learn the real signs of distress in the water and be prepared to respond or call for help quickly. Always remain vigilant and observant around water.

Always stay vigilant and within arm’s reach of children. Use buoyancy aids.

 It is vital to keep within arm’s reach and your eyes on children in any type of water – the bath, spa, pool, river, ocean, or a puddle. Not even for a second. Children and weak swimmers must also wear buoyancy vests when in or on water out of their depth, though this does not replace vigilance and proximity.

Swimming lessons are important

Australia has nearly 60 000km of coastline and 1.2 million backyard pools, so a large proportion of the population has easy access to recreational swimming, boating, and boarding. It stands to reason that everyone should learn to swim to a high proficiency and become skilled in the vagaries of ocean swimming. Ocean waves, wind and rips require knowledge, training and supported practice to swim safely. Vac Swim classes for children and adult swim lessons can improve pool swimming while joining the local surf club or tri-club can provide swimming knowledge in open water.

Know and avoid risky swimming locations and dangerous behaviour near open water

Swimming in cold lakes, streams, or rivers.Sudden immersion in these cold-water environments is dangerous due to:

1. Cold water shock (CWS), which is an involuntary inhalation that frequently happens on jumping into cold water. If this big breath occurs when the victim’s head is underwater, the victim will not resurface.

2. Heart attack from vasoconstriction of the blood vessels

3. Hypothermia, which causes confusion to even the most experienced swimmer

4. Fast flowing water which may submerge and trap a swimmer Murky dark water makes it difficult to view a submerged swimmer to rescue them

Avoid unsafe behavior

1. Drinking alcohol on or near water

2. Diving when water depth has not been ascertained

3. Refusal to wear a life jacket when on any watercraft

4. Inability to swim but going in regardless.

Do not swim alone

Always swim with a friend and never swim alone. Choose designated swimming locations and ensure lifeguards are on duty, then swim between the flags. Capable, swimming adults should supervise children vigilantly and always remain within arm’s reach.

For aspiring lifeguards looking for ocean or pool Lifeguard courses in Perth, we have got you covered here at the WCWS.

Privacy Policy

Who we are

Company Name: ILLYARRIE PTY LTD (A.C.N 634 010 085)
As Trustee For

The Emery Family Trust (A.B.N 33 170 747 028)
Trading As

West Coast Water Safety (A.B.N 33170747028)
https://wcws.com.au

West Coast First Aid Training (A.B.N 33170747028)
http://wcfat.com.au.

What personal data we collect and why we collect it

Comments

When visitors leave comments on the site we collect the data shown in the comments form, and also the visitor’s IP address and browser user agent string to help spam detection.

An anonymized string created from your email address (also called a hash) may be provided to the Gravatar service to see if you are using it. The Gravatar service privacy policy is available here: https://automattic.com/privacy/. After approval of your comment, your profile picture is visible to the public in the context of your comment.

Media

If you upload images to the website, you should avoid uploading images with embedded location data (EXIF GPS) included. Visitors to the website can download and extract any location data from images on the website.

Contact forms

Cookies

If you leave a comment on our site you may opt-in to saving your name, email address and website in cookies. These are for your convenience so that you do not have to fill in your details again when you leave another comment. These cookies will last for one year.

If you visit our login page, we will set a temporary cookie to determine if your browser accepts cookies. This cookie contains no personal data and is discarded when you close your browser.

When you log in, we will also set up several cookies to save your login information and your screen display choices. Login cookies last for two days, and screen options cookies last for a year. If you select “Remember Me”, your login will persist for two weeks. If you log out of your account, the login cookies will be removed.

If you edit or publish an article, an additional cookie will be saved in your browser. This cookie includes no personal data and simply indicates the post ID of the article you just edited. It expires after 1 day.

Embedded content from other websites

Articles on this site may include embedded content (e.g. videos, images, articles, etc.). Embedded content from other websites behaves in the exact same way as if the visitor has visited the other website.

These websites may collect data about you, use cookies, embed additional third-party tracking, and monitor your interaction with that embedded content, including tracking your interaction with the embedded content if you have an account and are logged in to that website.

Analytics

Who we share your data with

How long we retain your data

If you leave a comment, the comment and its metadata are retained indefinitely. This is so we can recognize and approve any follow-up comments automatically instead of holding them in a moderation queue.

For users that register on our website, we also store the personal information they provide in their user profile. All users can see, edit, or delete their personal information at any time (except they cannot change their username). Website administrators can also see and edit that information.

What rights you have over your data

If you have an account on this site, or have left comments, you can request to receive an exported file of the personal data we hold about you, including any data you have provided to us. You can also request that we erase any personal data we hold about you. This does not include any data we are obliged to keep for administrative, legal, or security purposes.

Where we send your data

Visitor comments may be checked through an automated spam detection service.

Your privacy is important to us. It is our policy to respect your privacy regarding any information we may collect from you across websites we own and operate.

We only ask for personal information when we truly need it to provide a service to you. We collect it by fair and lawful means, with your knowledge and consent. We also let you know why we’re collecting it and how it will be used.

We only retain collected information for as long as necessary to provide you with your requested service. What data we store, we’ll protect within commercially acceptable means to prevent loss and theft, as well as unauthorized access, disclosure, copying, use or modification. The information will not be stored in any form online.

We don’t share any personally identifying information publicly or with third-parties, except our third party RTO’s who will be issuing you with your certificates/qualifications or when required to by law.

Our website may link to external sites that are not operated by us. Please be aware that we have no control over the content and practices of these sites, and cannot accept responsibility or liability for their respective privacy policies.

You are free to refuse our request for your personal information, with the understanding that we may be unable to provide you with some of your desired services.

Your continued use of our website will be regarded as acceptance of our practices around privacy and personal information. If you have any questions about how we handle user data and personal information, feel free to contact us.

This policy is effective as of 5 June 2020.

What personal data we collect and why we collect it

Comments

When visitors leave comments on the site we collect the data shown in the comments form, and also the visitor’s IP address and browser user agent string to help spam detection.

An anonymized string created from your email address (also called a hash) may be provided to the Gravatar service to see if you are using it. The Gravatar service privacy policy is available here: https://automattic.com/privacy/. After approval of your comment, your profile picture is visible to the public in the context of your comment.

Media

If you upload images to the website, you should avoid uploading images with embedded location data (EXIF GPS) included. Visitors to the website can download and extract any location data from images on the website.

Contact forms

Cookies

If you leave a comment on our site you may opt-in to saving your name, email address and website in cookies. These are for your convenience so that you do not have to fill in your details again when you leave another comment. These cookies will last for one year.

If you visit our login page, we will set a temporary cookie to determine if your browser accepts cookies. This cookie contains no personal data and is discarded when you close your browser.

When you log in, we will also set up several cookies to save your login information and your screen display choices. Login cookies last for two days, and screen options cookies last for a year. If you select “Remember Me”, your login will persist for two weeks. If you log out of your account, the login cookies will be removed.

If you edit or publish an article, an additional cookie will be saved in your browser. This cookie includes no personal data and simply indicates the post ID of the article you just edited. It expires after 1 day.

Embedded content from other websites

Articles on this site may include embedded content (e.g. videos, images, articles, etc.). Embedded content from other websites behaves in the exact same way as if the visitor has visited the other website.

These websites may collect data about you, use cookies, embed additional third-party tracking, and monitor your interaction with that embedded content, including tracking your interaction with the embedded content if you have an account and are logged in to that website.

Analytics

Who we share your data with

How long we retain your data

If you leave a comment, the comment and its metadata are retained indefinitely. This is so we can recognize and approve any follow-up comments automatically instead of holding them in a moderation queue.

For users that register on our website, we also store the personal information they provide in their user profile. All users can see, edit, or delete their personal information at any time (except they cannot change their username). Website administrators can also see and edit that information.

What rights you have over your data

If you have an account on this site, or have left comments, you can request to receive an exported file of the personal data we hold about you, including any data you have provided to us. You can also request that we erase any personal data we hold about you. This does not include any data we are obliged to keep for administrative, legal, or security purposes.

Where we send your data

Visitor comments may be checked through an automated spam detection service.

Your privacy is important to us. It is our policy to respect your privacy regarding any information we may collect from you across websites we own and operate.

We only ask for personal information when we truly need it to provide a service to you. We collect it by fair and lawful means, with your knowledge and consent. We also let you know why we’re collecting it and how it will be used.

We only retain collected information for as long as necessary to provide you with your requested service. What data we store, we’ll protect within commercially acceptable means to prevent loss and theft, as well as unauthorized access, disclosure, copying, use or modification. The information will not be stored in any form online.

We don’t share any personally identifying information publicly or with third-parties, except our third party RTO’s who will be issuing you with your certificates/qualifications or when required to by law.

Our website may link to external sites that are not operated by us. Please be aware that we have no control over the content and practices of these sites, and cannot accept responsibility or liability for their respective privacy policies.

You are free to refuse our request for your personal information, with the understanding that we may be unable to provide you with some of your desired services.

Your continued use of our website will be regarded as acceptance of our practices around privacy and personal information. If you have any questions about how we handle user data and personal information, feel free to contact us.

This policy is effective as of 5 June 2020.

Box Jellyfish

A great article from National Geographic: About Box Jellyfish

The infamous box jellyfish developed its frighteningly powerful venom to instantly stun or kill prey, like fish and shrimp, so their struggle to escape wouldn’t damage its delicate tentacles.

Venom

Their venom is considered to be among the most deadly in the world, containing toxins that attack the heart, nervous system, and skin cells. It is so overpoweringly painful, human victims have been known to go into shock and drown or die of heart failure before even reaching shore. Survivors can experience considerable pain for weeks and often have significant scarring where the tentacles made contact.

Range and Appearance

Box jellies, also called sea wasps and marine stingers, live primarily in coastal waters off Northern Australia and throughout the Indo-Pacific. They are pale blue and transparent in color and get their name from the cube-like shape of their bell.

Tentacles

Up to 15 tentacles grow from each corner of the bell and can reach 10 feet in length. Each tentacle has about 5,000 stinging cells, which are triggered not by touch but by the presence of a chemical on the outer layer of its prey.

Highly-Advanced Adaptations

Box jellies are highly advanced among jellyfish. They have developed the ability to move rather than just drift, jetting at up to four knots through the water. They also have eyes grouped in clusters of six on the four sides of their bell. Each cluster includes a pair of eyes with a sophisticated lens, retina, iris and cornea, although without a central nervous system, scientists aren’t sure how they process what they see.

Do Not Resuscitate tattoos – What would you do?

Do Not Resuscitate tattoos

Image: New England Journal of Medicine

I get this question a bit during my training courses and kept thinking while I would continue to resuscitate the patient, I really must look into this. No need to do that now after the great article below arrived in my inbox from the guru’s at Royal Lifesaving WA. So here is the answer to this often asked question.

What would you do if you came across an unconscious person needing CPR, but they had a tattoo that said, ‘DO NOT RESUSCITATE’? Would you ignore the tattoo and continue treatment of the casualty? Would there be any legal ramifications of ignoring the tattoo? How would you know if the tattoo genuinely represents the person’s wishes, or if it’s just a joke?

These were questions faced by a team of doctors in the US when a patient was brought into a hospital emergency department. They discovered the words ‘DO NOT RESUSCITATE’ clearly tattooed across his chest, with the ‘Not’ underlined and what they presumed was his signature tattooed underneath the statement.

Faced with the dilemma of not knowing whether the tattoo was sincere, the doctors initially decided to administer some treatment while consulting with their hospital ethics team. The ethics team reviewed the case and advised the doctors to honour the tattoo, because it was reasonable to infer that it expressed the man’s wishes.

The man later died without being resuscitated, and it was discovered that he had, in fact, completed a form expressing his wishes which were consistent with the tattoo. The case sparked international discussion around the validity of these tattoos and whether they are legally binding. 

So what would happen in Australia?

Hospitals in Australia typically don’t have an ethics team on call to review individual cases. Advance care planning does exist here; however, the laws differ between states and territories. Generally, treating doctors must be satisfied that the person was competent when they made the directive, that they understood the risks of refusing care and that it applies to the current situation – all virtually impossible for a first responder to determine when coming across an unconscious person in need of CPR.

While a Do Not Resuscitate tattoo could in fact represent a person’s wishes, without sighting documentation to verify this we cannot know for sure. Perhaps it was their wish at the time of getting the tattoo, but they have since changed their mind. Perhaps the tattoo was done in jest, or while under the influence. Additionally, the shorter version that simply states the initials ‘DNR’ presents even more ambiguity – it could stand for something else entirely. 

First responders in Australia are trained that consent is implied if a casualty is unconscious. We cannot assume to know what the person would want at the time of needing care. It is important to always follow your training and provide CPR if it is required.

Rockfishing

Australia’s most dangerous sport – Rockfishing

Q: Is rockfishing safe?

Rock fishing is the most dangerous marine sport in Australia. Every year people die while rock fishing. If you want to rockfish, learn how to minimise the risks.

Q: How can I reduce the risks of rock fishing?

The three main ways to reduce the risks of rock fishing are:
1) check and understand the weather conditions and tides before you leave home
2) never fish alone
3) wear the right fishing safety gear.

Q: What is the best type of gear to wear when rock fishing?

Wear gear that stops you from slipping into the water or reduces problems if you do go into the surf. Wear shoes with non-slip soles or cleats. Rock plates or cleats are essential on wet, weedy rocks. Wear lightweight clothing and a flotation jacket, so that if you’re swept off rocks, you are buoyant and your clothes don’t drag you underwater. Also, wear head protection because many people who have drowned when swept off rocks have received some sort of head injury.

Q: How do I know if a spot is safe for rock fishing?

No place is perfectly safe for rock fishing. To minimise risks, fish only with others in places where experienced anglers go. Spend at least half an hour watching the wind and wave action before deciding whether a place is suitable. Think – what will your fishing spot be like in a few hours time with different tides and a weather change?

Q: Do I need a fishing license when rock fishing?

If you’re over 18 and not a pensioner, you need a license to fish. This includes rock fishing and collecting bait. Recreational fishing licences and renewals are processed through the Department of Transport’s DotDirect website. For more information visit www.fish.wa.gov.au

Q: I do enjoy collecting abalone, oysters or other molluscs off the rocks. Is this as dangerous as rock fishing?

Whenever you’re on coastal rocks where waves can sweep you into the water, you should follow the same practical guidelines to minimise the risk of being washed away – know and understand the weather conditions and tides, don’t go alone, and wear the right gear, especially non-slip shoes. And remember you need a fishing license when collecting any marine creatures, even by hand.

Boating Safety

Q: When and why should I check the weather conditions before I go out boating?


A thorough check of weather conditions is vital every time one goes boating. This includes having an appreciation of how the conditions may change throughout the day. A forecast change in weather for example may result in relatively calm conditions in the morning turning into potentially dangerous conditions in the afternoon.

Make sure your vessel is appropriate for the conditions and that you have the necessary experience to handle the forecast conditions. Remember if in doubt, don’t go out.

Q: I’ve been boating for years and can swim OK, do I still need to wear a life jacket?


Life jackets or PFDs are an important safety item on any boat and there should be one on board for each person. Children and poor swimmers should always wear a PFD.

Make sure that your life jacket is in good condition, accessible and ready for use or preferably WEAR IT because a life jacket stowed way will not do the job it was designed for.

Q: Is it OK to have a few beers when out on the water in a boat?


The combination of wind waves and weather can multiply the effects of alcohol and collectively are known as ‘boater fatigue’. Persons with ‘boater fatigue’ are at a greater risk of drowning should they fall into the water.

The blood alcohol limits are the same on the water as on our roads. A person in charge of a vessel must keep under the 0.05 blood alcohol limit. For commercial vessel operators the lower blood alcohol limit of 0.02 applies.